Learn Memento JavaScript: The Tutorials

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« as of 2020-09-03, editions Mobile 4.9.0, Desktop 1.8.4 »

Learn Memento JavaScript: The Tutorials

« applies to the Mobile 4.9.0 edition only »

Introduction to the Tutorials

These Tutorials are divided into Sets based on what audience you believe yourself to fit into. That will help the rank beginner to be shielded from language that can be aimed at people who have done some programming, those who are currently using Calculation fields, or whatever.

Sets are then divided into Tutorials, with each Tutorial introducing another feature of Memento JavaScript (MJ) that will build upon what was covered previously within the Tutorial. Within each Tutorial, I will usually introduce a language feature at a time, or else start a new tutorial.

If you look at all of it and think it is too big to learn, please just focus on the Sets & their Tutorials that are at the beginning. When you finish a feature, you’ll be ready & able to use that feature in your own libraries & fields -- starting with JavaScript fields -- and be ready for subsequent Tutorials.and Sets. I’ll give you an indication at the beginning of each Set to allow you to judge whether you can expect to be able to understand & use what will be presented in the Set. I may do that in some Tutorials as well, if it is a complex Set. Introduction to Memento JavaScript Before we get started, I intend to give an introduction to Memento JavaScript (MJ, for short), but a complete one. After that, you should be able to use the information in the Memento Wiki to do anything else you might want to do in Memento.

If you merely want to see briefly how to code syntax for certain commonly needed things in MJ, see the [Memento JavaScript Quick Guide].

➤ Note A Use Case is a computer term worthy of learning. I’ll keep such terms to a minimum, but this one is too handy not to learn. When I refer to a use case, it’s merely an instance where you need to accomplish something particular, in this case, in Memento JavaScript. The “something” is called a use case. For example, I’m writing this tutorial, and I need to have Sets and Tutorials. How will I show that a new Set has begun and where a new Tutorial has begun? WIthin the context of wanting to write a structured document like this tutorial, a use case might be Depict a Set as Distinguished from other Sets, or Provide a suitable heading for a Tutorial. By giving them names, they can be enumerated & listed, so you can then look at what you need to accomplish and check them off. I’ll need many more use cases than those, but I think you get the idea. It’s just a way to name what you want to do and describe it carefully -- concisely & clearly. Also, use cases can be high-level, like Develop the Arrays tutorial or detailed, like Describe how to iterate through an array.

Before the Web and when it was new, one learned a programming language, like C or Java, directly -- as a programming language. What makes JavaScript different is that it was invented specifically to enable the programming of Web pages and other Web stuff. Seldom do you find a primer or tutorial about the simple language of JavaScript without all that Web stuff. The learning tools and documents you almost always find teach you only in terms of the Web.

All we need is to use JavaScript as a mere programming language, like C with a tiny taste of Java (objects). Then you need to learn about using it to access Memento’s JavaScript library, MJ, and the other aspects in the Scripting section of the Memento Wiki, but I will provide a brief introduction to help you get started on that.

You may already have checked out the What to read until the Memento JavaScript Tutorial sections come out section of the current Memento Wiki page. If so, that’s excellent! If you feel you understood it all, that’s fantastic! But if you are uncertain about anything, and you probably will be, check out this tutorial. We assume no experience in programming, we'll be going much more slowly.